R&P Entries

Article(s)/ Chapter(s) in an Edited Book

Gyaase, P. O., Gyamfi, S. A., Kuranchie, A. & Koomson, F. S. (2020). The Integration of Information and Communication Technology in Pre-University Education in Ghana: A Principal Component Analysis.. In L. Tomei & D. Carbonara Handbook of Research on Diverse Teaching Strategies for the Technology-Rich Classroom.. Hershey, PA.: IGI Global. 109-123. DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-0238-9.ch009

Abstract
Educationists throughout the world are attesting to the capabilities of ICT for innovations in teaching and learning. There are evidences that integrating ICT into education enhances the learners' creativity and opens up new ways of knowledge acquisition and sharing. ICT is also credited with the improvement of teaching and learning of new skills needed to fully function in the 21st century knowledge society. This research was undertaken to evaluate the current state of ICT integration into the pre-university education and identify the barriers through principal components analysis and make the necessary recommendations. The research utilized both primary and secondary data. The primary data was collected through questionnaires and interviews while secondary data was obtained from reviews of government policy documents and reports. The study found an already existing ICT literacy education in the pre-university educational system in Ghana. There is also increasing access to and knowledge of ICT hardware and services. However, inadequate infrastructure, inadequate technology skills, lack of technical support, and inappropriate content are the challenges militating against effective integration of ICT in schools' curricula. Restructuring the curriculum of the various subjects, in-service training for teachers, integration of ICT into teacher training, and provision of internet connectivity infrastructure and services are recommended.

Sam, E. F., Blay, D., Antwi, S., Anaafi, C., & Adoma, J. A (2019). Pre-hospital and trauma care to road traffic accident victims: Experiences of residents living along accident-prone highways in Ghana. In O. Karcioglu & M. Eneyli Emergency Medicine and Trauma. London, UK: IntechOpen. 1-12. DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.86118 http://https://www.intechopen.com/books/emergency-medicine-and-trauma/pre-hospital-and-trauma-care-to-road-traffic-accident-victims-experiences-of-residents-living-along-.

Abstract
Road traffic accidents (RTAs) and associated injuries are a major public health problem in developing countries. The timely emergency pre-hospital care and subsequent transportation of accident victims to the health facility may help reduce the accident and injury outcomes. Available evidence suggests that RTA victims stand a greater chance of survival if attended to and cared for in a timely manner. This exploratory qualitative study set out to explore the experiences of residents of 12 communities along the Kasoa-Mankessim highway in Ghana (an accident-prone highway) in administering emergency pre-hospital care to RTA victims. We utilised data from a purposive sample of 80 respondents (i.e., people who have ever attended to RTA victims) from the communities through structured interview schedules. We found that the majority of the respondents had little knowledge and/or professional training in first-aid and emergency pre-hospital care to RTA victims. The skills and knowledge exhibited were gained through years of rescue services to RTA victims. The “scoop and run” method of first-aid care was predominant among the respondents. We recommend regular community member (layperson first responder) sensitisation and training on emergency pre-hospital care for RTA victims.

Kyiileyang, M. (2018). Literary Analysis of Dagara Folktales Depicting Indigenous Health. In J. B. A. Afful, P.K.T. Grant & A.Y. M De-Souza The Humanities and Indigenous Knowledge in Health. Cape Coast: Faculty of Arts, University of Cape Coast. 43-83.

Abstract
Folktale narration constitutes one of the most significant phenomena in Dagara expressive culture. This paper examines this literary technique which is employed in Dagara to expose some indigenous health practices prevalent in their societies. Okpewho’s narrative techniques formed the theoretical basis of the study. The data consisted of folktales chosen from separate communities from Nandom of northwestern Ghana to reflect diversity. The analysis of the data showed, first, that the major narrative skills used were symbolic language, tone, humour, suspense, mood, dialogue, effective use of body language and histrionic gestures. The second main finding relates to the dexterity and variety of narrative skills employed by the performers. The contribution of the study lies in the fact that traditional health practices that were common in Dagara societies and are now abandoned, are made known through folktale performance. Keywords: Dagara folktales; health practices; narrative structure; narrative language performance

Danso-Wiredu, E. Y., Fisker, J. K., & Pugalis, L (2018). The production of slums: Old Fadama as an alternative space of urban dwelling. In Jens Kaae Fisker, Letizia Chiappini, Lee Pugalis, Antonella Bruzzese The Production of Alternative Urban Spaces. London: Routledge. 130-152. http://https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C5&q=Danso-Wiredu%2C+E.+Y.%2C+Fisker%2C+J.+K.%2C+%26+Pugalis%2C+L.+%282018%29.+The+production+of+slums%3A+Old+Fadama+as+an+alternative+space+of+urban+dwelling.+In+The+Production+of+Alternative+Urban+Spaces+%28pp.+130-152%29.+Routledge.+ISBN%3A+978-1.

Abstract
The inability of the Ghana government to provide homes for its low income citizens have forced many urban dwellers to rent ‘cheap’ homes in poor communities or become care takers of uncompleted houses. Old Fadama, the largest squatter-slum community in Ghana is an example of a poor community which accommodate most migrants in Accra, especially those migrating from Northern Ghana. The paper explores how the community with a population of over 80,000 has turned a waterlogged area into a habitable one. Usually the acceptable place to call a home for individuals and families is to reside in houses made up of sleeping, bathing and toilet rooms, but in Old Fadama, residents have one room to call a home. They instead depend on community bathrooms, toilets and restaurants for survival. To pay as low rent as possible, many residents live in what they termed ‘group-rooms’, where rent is shared among the room members. The paper argues that Old Fadama stands out as a community that survive at the blind side of the state. Although, the state has neglected the community entirely in terms of formal governance, the people govern themselves informally by instituting traditional rulers which govern the community as though the people are under formal rules. The paper makes a contribution to knowledge by challenging the concept of housing as an all inclusive components of a living place. A key finding of the chapter is how local associations directly influence access to general housing resources. A relevant contribution made by the paper is how housing is regulated through the lenses of local associations. Processes for accessing housing in Old Fadama is therefore a reaction to the housing market failure.

Sakyi-Hagan, N., Quansah, R. E., & Hanson, R. (2019). The microscale science equipment as a conceptual and attitudinal changing tool towards sustainable development. In J. Opara Outlook on human capacity building and development: A handbook of research in honour of Professor Ibrahim Njodi. Maduguri, Nigeria: University of Maduguri Press. 222 - 231. DOI: isbn: 978-978-2323-35-4 http://www.unimaid.edu.ng.

Abstract
Science educators have for years, stressed on the importance of science activities to help students understand the theory and practice of science, as it influences everything about the life of an individual to that of an entire community. This chapter would like to do a conceptual and attitudinal analysis to assess the possibilities that the mass adoption of the small-scale equipment could afford Ghanaian students. Apart from the unavailability of science equipment and risks factors involved in using them, lack of electricity, water and conventional fragile equipment (some of which require training before use) have been found to be other factors that limit teachers‘ desires to organise practical activities for their students. This study seeks to present the conceptual and attitudinal changing nature of adopting micro-scale science equipment by analysing six laboratory activities from first year under graduate courses in Ghana. The main objective would be to create an awareness of the existence and possibility of using micro-scale equipment in science practical activities among teacher trainees, science educators and curriculum developers of science education in Ghana. This is likely to ensure that meaningful, safer, sustainable and concept-based science practical activities are performed in schools. Keywords: Science, Education, Equipment, Sustainable Development.

Faculty of Science EducationMay 17, 20192019/2020

Adu Gyamfi, S., Ohemeng Gyaase, P. & Ansong-Gyimah, K. (2016). Designing Blended Learning Environment for Pre-Service Teachers: The Moderating Role of Formative Experiment. In L. Lui & D. C. Gibson Research Highlights in Technology and Teacher Education 2016. Waynesville, NC., USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education. 179 - 187. http://www.aace.org/bookshelf.htm.

Abstract
This study used formative experiment to design and test a blended learning environment intervention on the teaching and learning of Communication Skills for pre-service teachers. The learning environment was designed on the Moodle platform to combine online learning support with traditional face-face lectures. Pre-intervention baseline data and post-intervention data were collected for comparison. Analysis of the findings showed wide acceptance of use of the blended learning environment. There was appreciable improvement of students’ participation and interaction in the course and this resulted in the improvement of the key areas of the Communication Skills course among the pre-service teachers. Lecturers were also able to interact with the students better than in face-to-face classroom setting. It was concluded that the design of a blended learning environment could improve teaching and learning in Ghanaian Universities in courses where large class sizes exist.

Faculty of Technical EducationSep 28, 20172017/2018

Wornyo, A. A. (2015). English Lingua Franca (ELF) as a Means of Communication among Construction Workers in Ghana. In . : International Journal of Language Learning and Applied Linguistics World. 9 (4), 41-56.

Abstract
In countries that English is spoken as a second language, it is mainly learnt in the classroom as a school subject. However, individuals who have not had formal education can acquire and use English in informal settings outside the classroom. This study explores the various social contact situations and instances that motivate or make it necessary for construction workers to acquire and use English at the construction site. It also seeks to discover the communicative strategies employed by the construction workers to communicate. Using observations and interviews, it was discovered that some construction workers acquire and use English through their interaction with workers they do not share the same Ghanaian language with. The findings of the study show the reality of the global use of English as a language for communication beyond academic and official circles. The study concludes that though the English acquired and used among the construction workers is not the Standard English spoken by educated Ghanaians, it enables them to communicate to get their work done at the construction site.

Wornyo, A. A. (2015). English Lingua Franca (ELF) as a Means of Communication among Construction Workers in Ghana. In Editor in Chief : Taher Bahrani . Malaysia: International Journal of Language Learning and Applied Linguistics World. 41-56.

Abstract
Abstract In countries that English is spoken as a second language, it is mainly learnt in the classroom as a school subject. However, individuals who have not had formal education can acquire and use English in informal settings outside the classroom. This study explores the various social contact situations and instances that motivate or make it necessary for construction workers to acquire and use English at the construction site. It also seeks to discover the communicative strategies employed by the construction workers to communicate. Using observations and interviews, it was discovered that some construction workers acquire and use English through their interaction with workers they do not share the same Ghanaian language with. The findings of the study show the reality of the global use of English as a language for communication beyond academic and official circles. The study concludes that though the English acquired and used among the construction workers is not the Standard English spoken by educated Ghanaians, it enables them to communicate to get their work done at the construction site. Key words: construction workers, social interaction, communicative strategies

Ananga, E. D., Adzahlie-Mensah, V. and Tamanja, E. M. J. (2016). Higher education and employability in Ghana. In Tristan McCowan Universities, Employability and Inclusive Development Project (2013–16). Revitalising Higher Education in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa. United Kingdom: British Council. 77 – 90. http://http//britishcouncil.org/education/ihe.

Atintono, S. A. (2015). The semantics and metaphorical extensions of temperature terms in Gurene. In Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm The Linguistics of Temperature. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company. 73-106. http://www.benjamins.com.

Abstract
Temperature phenomenon are universal, and languages show diversity in the ways in which they express the experience of temperature

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