R&P Entries

Article(s)/ Chapter(s) in an Edited Book

Adu Gyamfi, S., Ohemeng Gyaase, P. & Ansong-Gyimah, K. (2016). Designing Blended Learning Environment for Pre-Service Teachers: The Moderating Role of Formative Experiment. In L. Lui & D. C. Gibson Research Highlights in Technology and Teacher Education 2016. Waynesville, NC., USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education. 179 - 187. http://www.aace.org/bookshelf.htm.

Abstract
This study used formative experiment to design and test a blended learning environment intervention on the teaching and learning of Communication Skills for pre-service teachers. The learning environment was designed on the Moodle platform to combine online learning support with traditional face-face lectures. Pre-intervention baseline data and post-intervention data were collected for comparison. Analysis of the findings showed wide acceptance of use of the blended learning environment. There was appreciable improvement of students’ participation and interaction in the course and this resulted in the improvement of the key areas of the Communication Skills course among the pre-service teachers. Lecturers were also able to interact with the students better than in face-to-face classroom setting. It was concluded that the design of a blended learning environment could improve teaching and learning in Ghanaian Universities in courses where large class sizes exist.

Faculty of Technical EducationSep 28, 20172017/2018

Wornyo, A. A. (2015). English Lingua Franca (ELF) as a Means of Communication among Construction Workers in Ghana. In . : International Journal of Language Learning and Applied Linguistics World. 9 (4), 41-56.

Abstract
In countries that English is spoken as a second language, it is mainly learnt in the classroom as a school subject. However, individuals who have not had formal education can acquire and use English in informal settings outside the classroom. This study explores the various social contact situations and instances that motivate or make it necessary for construction workers to acquire and use English at the construction site. It also seeks to discover the communicative strategies employed by the construction workers to communicate. Using observations and interviews, it was discovered that some construction workers acquire and use English through their interaction with workers they do not share the same Ghanaian language with. The findings of the study show the reality of the global use of English as a language for communication beyond academic and official circles. The study concludes that though the English acquired and used among the construction workers is not the Standard English spoken by educated Ghanaians, it enables them to communicate to get their work done at the construction site.

Wornyo, A. A. (2015). English Lingua Franca (ELF) as a Means of Communication among Construction Workers in Ghana. In Editor in Chief : Taher Bahrani . Malaysia: International Journal of Language Learning and Applied Linguistics World. 41-56.

Abstract
Abstract In countries that English is spoken as a second language, it is mainly learnt in the classroom as a school subject. However, individuals who have not had formal education can acquire and use English in informal settings outside the classroom. This study explores the various social contact situations and instances that motivate or make it necessary for construction workers to acquire and use English at the construction site. It also seeks to discover the communicative strategies employed by the construction workers to communicate. Using observations and interviews, it was discovered that some construction workers acquire and use English through their interaction with workers they do not share the same Ghanaian language with. The findings of the study show the reality of the global use of English as a language for communication beyond academic and official circles. The study concludes that though the English acquired and used among the construction workers is not the Standard English spoken by educated Ghanaians, it enables them to communicate to get their work done at the construction site. Key words: construction workers, social interaction, communicative strategies

Ananga, E. D., Adzahlie-Mensah, V. and Tamanja, E. M. J. (2016). Higher education and employability in Ghana. In Tristan McCowan Universities, Employability and Inclusive Development Project (2013–16). Revitalising Higher Education in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa. United Kingdom: British Council. 77 – 90. http://http//britishcouncil.org/education/ihe.

Atintono, S. A. (2015). The semantics and metaphorical extensions of temperature terms in Gurene. In Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm The Linguistics of Temperature. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company. 73-106. http://www.benjamins.com.

Abstract
Temperature phenomenon are universal, and languages show diversity in the ways in which they express the experience of temperature

Nsiah Asante (2014). The State of ICT Integration in the Early Years in Ghana Schools. In C. A. Shoniregun, G. Akmayeva (Editor in Chiefs) . Literacy Information and Computer Education Journal (LICEJ), Special Issue, Volume 3, Issue 1, 2014: Infonomics Society. 1259-1266. DOI: issn 2040 2589 (online) http://www.infonomics-society.org/LICEJ/The%20State%20of%20ICT%20Integration%20in%20the%20Early%20Years%20in%20Ghana%20Schools.pdf.

Abstract
This study investigated the status of ICT use in early childhood education in Ghana. It explored the availability of some technological resources in two hundred and fifty (250) schools from three regions in Ghana. It was also to understand the current state of technology integration in the early childhood classrooms. Each participant was conveniently selected from each school for the study. Participants responded to a Researcher - made questionnaire which sought to find out the type (s) of technological resources available as well as teachers’ background in ICT. Fifty (50) out of the (250) participants were selected purposely and interviewed. The study revealed that the integration of ICT in Ghana’s early years’ classrooms is not encouraging especially in the public schools. The computer was identified as the most used technological resource available in the various schools. Though the findings suggest the participants hold a positive perspective of the importance of ICT integration in the early years, 60% of participants teaching at the early years have no knowledge in ICT and 67% of them do not integrate it in their teaching. It is recommended that pre service teachers and teachers be purposely trained on the use and integration of ICT in teaching.

Ofosu-Kusi, Y. (2014). Dreams, expectations and troubled existence: Childhood in the terrains of informality in Accra, Ghana. In B. Lundt & U. Marzolp (Eds) Narrating (Hi)stories in West Africa. Berlin: Lit Verlag. 216-229.

Abstract
The astounding level of disorganization in Accra is demonstrated by the myriad of makeshift structures and the palpable lack of attention to laws and regulations. The ability to live and indulge in street-level commerce without recourse to relevant laws has over the years been a major attraction for children and young people. However, the lives of these children are marked by drama, from the initial thought of migration to the real-life experiences in the city, especially within the context of the implausible assumption of ready employment, a steady stream of income and a good city life. Following a programme of qualitative research, 31 children were variously engaged in collaborative dialogues through planned and unplanned encounters, and supplemented by photographic data from photo-elicitation. The interactively generated accounts arising from the study are deployed to show that a sea of difference exists between children’s dreams and expectations of Accra - often appropriated from hearsay and stories - and their experiential realities.

Ofosu-Kusi, Y. & Danso-Wiredu, E. Y. (2014). Neoliberalism and housing provision in Accra, Ghana: The illogic of an over-liberalised housing market. In L. Asuelime, J. Yaro, & S. Francis (Eds) Selected Themes in African Development Studies: Economic Growth, Governance and Environment. New York: Springer. 95-109.

Abstract
The economic hardships of the late1970s forced many African countries to rely on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank for financial relief. The two institutions’ reaction in almost all cases was to impose structural adjustment programmes (SAP) on those countries in an attempt to stabilize and grow their economies. Ghana became an unwilling apostle in the 1980s when it implemented various rounds and was portrayed as an extraordinary example of the efficacy of neo-liberal policies in restructuring broken economies. Primary among the benefits was increase in domestic and foreign private investments, especially in the housing industry. Since then, Accra has faced an overproduction of housing for high-income earners thus leading to a dramatic rise of gated communities. On the other hand, there has been virtually no production of housing for low-income earners, thereby deepening their dependence on the informal sector for housing. With this stark difference, the paper argues that those neoliberal policies have rendered government virtually irrelevant in the housing market, especially in the provision of housing for low income earners, and for that reason accelerated the development of poor housing and slums in the city.

Dawson-Amoah, G., & Wilson, K. B. (2014). Using the Internet. In Apeanti, W. O. & Essel , D. D. Easy-To-Master, Introduction To ICT. Kumasi, Ghana: PrintKraft. 344-358.

Abstract

Jun 22, 2015

Essel, D. D., & Wilson, K. B (2014). . In Apeanti, W. O. & Essel , D. D. Easy-To-Master, Introduction To ICT. Kumasi, Ghana: PrintKraft. 189-311.

Abstract

Jun 22, 2015

Pages