R&P Entries

Published Proceedings of Conferences/Workshop/Symposia/Seminar

Gyamfi, S. A., Koranteng, F. N., Apau, R. & Ansong-Gyimah, K., (2020). Predicting engagement on collaborative learning systems: Perceptions of postgraduate students. International Conference on Educational and Information Technology (ICEIT2020). New York: Association for Computing Machinery. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3383923.3383959. http://https://dl.acm.org/doi/abs/10.1145/3383923.3383959?download=true

Abstract
One of the main prerequisites for the implementation of collaborative learning systems in higher education is academic engagement by students. At the same time, user satisfaction on collaborative learning systems is a precondition for acceptance of such software by students. This presupposes that, for academic institutions to enhance students’ participation and engagement on collaborative systems, they must be satisfied with the software. The main aim of this paper is to predict postgraduate students’ academic engagement on collaborative learning systems. The paper proposes a model that integrates the Confirmation Expectation Model and Information System (IS) Success Model in order to uncover the factors that influence students’ satisfaction while they are using collaborative learning systems. Using a questionnaire, the model is validated with responses from tertiary students in two public universities in Ghana. A PLS-SEM analysis of 146 valid responses was conducted. The hypothesized model explained 25.7% of the variance on Engagement. The results also confirmed all predicted relationships. Specifically, System Quality and Confirmation predicted Perceived Usefulness. Information Quality, Service Quality and Perceived Usefulness also influenced User Satisfaction and User Satisfaction impacted Engagement. The findings provide insightful perspective for institutions and developers of collaborative learning systems that could help to provide information that is relevant to students’ academic activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amedeker, M. K., (2020). Changing educational policies: Implications for ICT integration in science instruction and performance of students in Ghanaian senior high schools. P. Kommers, A. B. N., Viana, T. Issa, & P. Isaias (Eds.). The 7th International Conference on Educational Technologies 2020 (ICEduTech, 2020). Sao Paulo, Brazil: IADIS Press.

Abstract
Every country’s educational policy directs the implementation and success or otherwise of education outcomes. This study analysed some educational policies of the Ministry of Education of Ghana to determine the current state of use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in science instruction in Ghanaian senior high schools. Most of the policies aimed at promoting functional learning through use of ICTs. However, the various senior high school science syllabuses are not explicit on the use of ICTs for teaching science. Also ICTs integration in science teaching at the senior high school levels has been constrained by uncoordinated and a flurry of policy implementation procedures. It is recommended that education should be democratised to engage local practitioners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationJul 04, 20202020/2021

Acquaye, V.; Addai-Mununkum, R.; Acquah, S.; Ananga, E. D., (2019). The more, the merrier; An assessment of the effects of small group discussion technique on students’ social interactions in the implementation of the new B.Ed. Curriculum. J. Anamuah Mensah, J Fletcher (Eds) 2nd National Teacher Education Learning Summit. Accra: NCTE/TTEL. (2) 1. http://ncte.edu.gh

Abstract
The introduction of the National Teachers Standard (NTS) necessitates a framework that will guide the education of pre-service teachers. Among others, the National Teacher Education Curriculum Framework (NTECF) emphasizes an interactive, learner-focused approach to modelling good teaching. The NTECF is also supported by the NTS as the determiner of what a ‘competent’ teacher is. As part of cross-cutting issues, the NTECF mentions social/collaborative skills as one of the required outcomes that are necessary for teachers’ professional development, in order that they can ensure learning for all. In this paper, we present findings from a study aimed at assessing the effects of using small group discussion technique as a means of inculcating in student-teachers the much-needed social skills. Using quantitative descriptive survey technique, the study explored student-teachers’ assessment of their acquisition of social/collaborative skills. A sample of three hundred and six (306) student-teachers, drawn from the premiering groups for the new B.Ed. in Basic Education and B.Ed. in Early Grade Education in the University of Education, Winneba, were purposively sampled for the study. The data was analysed using descriptive quantitative analysis. The major findings revealed that most (72%) student teachers preferred working in groups to undertaking assignments individually, eighty-four per cent (84%) also reported improvement in their ability to explain their perspectives well to others improvements in ability to socialize better and some hopes of developing lasting relationships was reported. The paper also shed light on some challenges such as poor group write ups as reported by student teachers. In conclusion, we highlighted the implications of the findings for the full roll-out of the B.Ed. curriculum in the colleges of education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Educational StudiesJul 05, 20192020/2021

Acquaye, V.; Addai-Mununkum, R.; Acquah, S.; Ananga, E. D., (2019). The new BEd Curriculum and ‘making’ of 21st century teachers in Ghana: UEW student-teachers’ perception of student centred pedagogies.. J. Anamuah Mensah, J Fletcher (Eds) 2nd National Teacher Education Learning Summit. Accra: NCTE/TTEL. (2) 1. http://ncte.edu.gh

Abstract
The promulgation of the National Teachers’ Standards has brought to the fore the need “to prepare a 21st century teacher who is “effective, engaging, inspirational, and fully prepared to teach the basic school curriculum in order to improve the learning outcomes and life chances of all learners. To do this, teachers ought to demonstrate skills in problem solving, communication, Information & Communications Technology (ICT) among others. With the introduction of the new BEd curriculum for colleges of Education & Teacher Education Universities, scholarship is curious about how the promise of the new (world-class) curriculum is manifesting its’ outcome in practice. To respond to this uncertainty, we designed a quantitative descriptive survey to explore how student-teachers perceive of the opportunities offered by the new BEd curriculum for their development as 21st century teachers? Four hundred and seventy-three (473) first year students enrolled in BEd Basic Education and BEd Early Grade programmes at the University of Education – Winneba were engaged in the study that required them to fill out a 49 item questionnaire. Following descriptive quantitative analyses, the data revealed Lecturers’ innovative use of smartphones during lectures improved students ICT skills. Student-teachers also gave positive reviews of new lecture room organization, problem solving pedagogies, and opportunities to present before their peers. While admitting to the enormous gains the new curriculum has occasioned for their professional development, the students identified challenges to the implementation of the new curriculum such as poor internet connectivity, large class size and other logistical concerns. Implications of these findings for scholarship and practice are presented for discussion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Educational StudiesJul 05, 20192020/2021

Nsiah Asante, J. & Hanson, R., (2018). Investigating Ghanaian Early Children's Conservation of Number: A Case Study in the Winneba Municipality. C. A. Shoniregun Canada International Conference on Education (CICE-2018). UK: Infonomics Society. DOI: 10.2053/cice:2018.0097. http://CICE@2018 Published by Infonomics Society

Abstract
The study was based on Piaget’s theory of Cognitive development and the main aim of the study was to find out if Piaget’s theory holds for Ghanaian early children. One hundred and eight (108) Early School children were randomly selected from three (3) public and two (3) private schools purposively selected from schools in the Winneba Municipality.The procedure used was mainly interview method using some of Piaget’s tasks to test for conservation of number. The 7-8 years old were identified to be conservers of number than the 3-6 years old. Generally, the results supported Piaget’s theory of cognitive development where the older children (7-8 years) performed better than the younger children (3-4 years; 5-6 years) at the number tasks. In conclusion, the results of this study agree with Piaget’s theory of Cognitive development that the concrete operational stage marks the development of conservation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationMay 17, 20192019/2020

Hanson, R., (2018). An investigation into teacher trainees' understanding of chemical stability and its implications. C. A. Shoniregun Canada International Conference on Education (CICE-2018). UK: Infonomics Society. DOI: 10 2053/cice.2018.0020. http://CICE@2018 Published by Infonomics Society

Abstract
This paper portrays the way some higher education learners perceive the concept of chemical. It assesses the nature and possible origins of these conceptions. One hundred and thirty-eight teacher trainees in a teaching university, who were purposely selected, participated in this case study. These teacher trainees had exhibited persistent inabilities in deciphering between stable and reactive species in a periodic chemistry course. Instruments used in gathering data were worksheets and focus group discussions, which were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Records of the discussions were transcribed after thematic descriptions. It was found that more than half the trainees’ concepts of a full shell and increased nuclear charge connoting stability were the genesis for their observed alternative conceptions about chemical stability. These findings will contribute and add to existing knowledge among the science learning community. Further remediation was recommended to enable the trainees to form proper mental models of the concept of chemical stability and its application through innovative teaching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationMay 17, 20192019/2020

Hanson, R., (2018). An investigation into teacher trainees' understanding of chemical stability and its implications. C. A, Shoniregum Canada International Conference on Education (CICE-2018). UK: Infonomics Society. DOI: 10 2053/cice.2018.0020. http://CICE@2018 Published by Infonomics Society

Abstract
This paper portrays the way some higher education learners perceive the concept of chemical. It assesses the nature and possible origins of these conceptions. One hundred and thirty-eight teacher trainees in a teaching university, who were purposely selected, participated in this case study. These teacher trainees had exhibited persistent inabilities in deciphering between stable and reactive species in a periodic chemistry course. Instruments used in gathering data were worksheets and focus group discussions, which were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Records of the discussions were transcribed after thematic descriptions. It was found that more than half the trainees’ concepts of a full shell and increased nuclear charge connoting stability were the genesis for their observed alternative conceptions about chemical stability. These findings will contribute and add to existing knowledge among the science learning community. Further remediation was recommended to enable the trainees to form proper mental models of the concept of chemical stability and its application through innovative teaching.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationMay 17, 20192019/2020

Matemba,Y. H. & Addai-Mununkum, R, (2018). Exclusion and Misclusion of religion in Religious Education: Lessons from two qualitative studies in Sub-Saharan Africa-Malawi and Ghana. European Conference on Educational Research (ECER). Bolzano, Italy: ECER.

Abstract
This paper draws on the findings of a comparative study (2011-2014) that examined the problem of religious misrepresentation in RE in Malawi and Ghana. In an earlier paper (recently published in 2017), we examined how classroom discourse in the two countries exacerbates rather challenge religious misrepresentation. The present paper, follow the specific issues of exclusion and misclusion of religion in RE not only in classroom discourse but also in RE ‘texts’ (textbooks, curriculum/syllabuses and policy enactments).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Educational StudiesSep 23, 20182018/2019

Addai-Mununkum, R.; Abroampa, W. K. ; Agordzo Edoh-Torgah, N, (2018). Decolonized curriculum in colonized contexts: Assessing Ghanaian Public schools’ role in the decolonization agenda.. American Education Research Association Annual Meeting 2018. Washington DC: AERA. http://www.aera.net

Abstract
Ghana has since independence taken steps to Africanize its education system. Sixty-years on, we ask how challenging it has been for the school curriculum to live its promise of inculcating Afrocentrism in students. Using a qualitative case study design, we researched six public schools. Data from interviews, focus groups and observations lead us to conclude that Afrocentrism inspired curriculum is in place in Ghanaian public schools. Yet, the contexts within which such curricula are implemented are themselves centers of complex interrelationships between personal faiths, institutional ideology, and school ownership/management. We draw from these to echo that curricula reforms are successful if equivalent ideological and structural reforms are implemented in the contexts within which such curriculum will be implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Educational StudiesSep 10, 20182018/2019

Samlafo, B.V, (2018). Selenium - mercury antagonism in human blood samples from residents of Wassa West District, a mining area in Ghana. ICRST (2018) VIIIth International Conference on Researches in Science & Technology.. Rome, Italy: ICRST Ltd.

Abstract
This paper sought to evaluate Se to Hg (Se:Hg) molar ratio in human blood samples from residents of Wassa West district of Ghana, a region which has a long history of gold mining. Determining Hg levels alone in either environmental samples or human body fluids or tissues is necessary but not essential enough to assess the health risk of a given population. The levels of Se in such matrices are the fundamental factor in health risk assessment of Hg exposure and toxicity. Fifty blood samples were collected from volunteers from Wassa West District and were analysed for Hg and Se concentrations. The molar concentrations of each element were calculated and the corresponding Se:Hg molar ratios were determined. The results indicated that the molar concentrations of Se ranged from 0,35 µM to 62.38µM with a mean value of 25.26 µM, while Hg molar concentrations ranged from 0.05 µM to 4.65 µM with a mean value of 0.38 µM. The ratios ranged from 0.97 to 958 with a mean value of 155.40. Apart from, one subject, all the Se:Hg molar ratios were above one, which may imply that the residents have enough Se (well nourished) to prevent Hg toxicity.The precision and accuracy of the analytical methods were determined by the standard reference materials, DORM-2 and GBW 09101. The measurement precision which was determined using relative standard deviation fell within 4%.The results of the analysed samples were within ±5% of the certified values of the standard reference materials. Key words: blood, Selenium, mercury, antagonism, molar ratio, mining, health, risk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationMay 31, 20182018/2019

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