R&P Entries

Conferences/Workshop/Symposia/Seminar with Presentations

Owusu, S.
30th West African Languages Congress & 10th Linguistics Association of Ghana Conference. University of Education, Winneba, Ghana July 31 to August 5, 2017

Paper presented:
Language Anxiety and its Effect on Oral Performance Of Students during Post-Internship Seminar Presentations at The Faculty of Ghanaian Languages Education, UEW

Abstract
Language anxiety has been found to have an adverse effect on oral performance. Many second/foreign language learners often experience the feeling of unease, nervousness, apprehension, and intimidation when they are performing in a second/foreign language, a phenomenon known as xenoglossophobia. It was hypothesised that the students at the Faculty of Ghanaian Languages Education, University of Education, Winneba would experience language anxiety during the post-internship seminar presentations. Many of them are native speakers of the languages they are studying at the University. With the exception of the general courses which are taught and assessed in English, teaching and assessment of the departmental courses are done in Ghanaian languages. However, the post-internship seminar presentations are done in English in the presence of their lecturers and lecturers from other departments. The students may be intimidated by the presence of their professors because of the fear of negative evaluation. This may cause language anxiety in the students which may also have negative impact on their oral performance. Using the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS), the paper investigated the effects language anxiety on oral performance of students during the post-internship seminar presentations at the Faculty of Ghanaian Languages Education. The objective of the paper was to answer the question: How does language anxiety affect the oral performance of students during the post-internship seminar presentations? 200 level 400 students were purposively selected for the study. The results indicated that the respondents experienced language anxiety during the post-internship seminar presentations, and that language anxiety was the major cause of the students’ poor performance during the seminar presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danso, H.
7th West Africa Built Environment Research (WABER) Conference. University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana 16-18 August 2017

Paper presented:
Improving Water Resistance of Compressed Earth Blocks Enhanced with Natural Fibres

Abstract
Studies have shown a great potential for the use of CEBs as a sustainable building material due to its economic, environmental and social benefits. This study investigates the water resistance characteristics of CEBs reinforced with natural fibres. The fibres were sourced from coconut husk, sugarcane bagasse and oil palm fruit at 1 wt% added to two soil samples. The CEB specimen size of 290 × 140 × 100 mm were made at a constant pressure of 10 MPa and dried in the sun for 21 days. Accelerated erosion test was conducted to determine the resistance of the specimen to continuous rainfall condition. It was discovered that the fibres helped in reducing the erodability rate of the blocks, though there were some degree of damage. The difference between the water resistance of the unreinforced and fibre reinforced CEBs were found to be statistically significant. Furthermore, the surface of the fibre reinforced blocks eroded rapidly in depth than the internal part, and there was reduction in the depth difference of the erosion with increase time of water spraying on the specimens. The study concludes that though the addition of fibres in soil blocks does not completely prevent the block from erosion, the impact of the fibres on the blocks significantly reduce the erosion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquaye, V.N.A.
Images of Childhood and the Future: Cross-cultural Perspectives. Europa-University, Flensburg, Germany 29th June – 1st July, 2017

Paper presented:
Young but not clueless; exploring children’s perception of a better future through creative writing

Abstract
Most stories written for and about children were written by adults. In such stories, adults try to portray children’s views, aspirations, fears and sentiments. Although adults might write based on their experiences from their childhood, research has shown that there are significant differences in children’s thoughts and actions and adults thinking for children and thus for research on children to be effective, they must be involved. The purpose of this study was to explore children’s perception of better future in childhood through creative writing. The children’s stories were subjected to close reading and text analysis with particular attention to their presentation of details on incidence, characters, conflicts and resolution as they express their ideas of a better future. They focused more on time spent in school. Their time spent at home was minimal and focus mostly on things they lacked at home. They presented themselves as hardworking, hopeful and brilliant. They emphasized conflicts with their parents and siblings more than friends. They portrayed their friends as sources of solace to run to when the home becomes unbearable. In their resolutions, they enumerated their future desires and settled on working harder especially in their studies to change their future. They also prayed to God to provide what they or their parents cannot afford. It was deduced from their stories that children understand their dependency but insist decisions concerning them be left to them, yet, their needs and wants must be met. They also want more quality relationship with especially their parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquaye, V.N.A.
Images of Childhood and the Future: Cross-cultural Perspectives. Europa-University, Flensburg, Germany 29th June – 1st July, 2017

Paper presented:
Young but not clueless; exploring children’s perception of a better future through creative writing

Abstract
Most stories written for and about children were written by adults. In such stories, adults try to portray children’s views, aspirations, fears and sentiments. Although adults might write based on their experiences from their childhood, research has shown that there are significant differences in children’s thoughts and actions and adults thinking for children and thus for research on children to be effective, they must be involved. The purpose of this study was to explore children’s perception of better future in childhood through creative writing. The children’s stories were subjected to close reading and text analysis with particular attention to their presentation of details on incidence, characters, conflicts and resolution as they express their ideas of a better future. They focused more on time spent in school. Their time spent at home was minimal and focus mostly on things they lacked at home. They presented themselves as hardworking, hopeful and brilliant. They emphasized conflicts with their parents and siblings more than friends. They portrayed their friends as sources of solace to run to when the home becomes unbearable. In their resolutions, they enumerated their future desires and settled on working harder especially in their studies to change their future. They also prayed to God to provide what they or their parents cannot afford. It was deduced from their stories that children understand their dependency but insist decisions concerning them be left to them, yet, their needs and wants must be met. They also want more quality relationship with especially their parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquaye, V.N.A.
Childhood, Children and the Future: African and European Perspectives in the 21st Century. University of Education, Winneba, Ghana 1st and 2nd March, 2016,

Paper presented:
Issues about children, childhood and the future as presented in the creative writing of undergraduate students of Basic Education Department, University of Education, Winneba.

Abstract
Childhood is a stage in life that molds the individual and continues to dominate most perception of life. Most adult reactions are repercussions of childhood experiences. In writing children’s stories, it is empirical for most adults to roll back years of growing up and look once again with the eyes of the child at issues of life of which the child is at the center. This paper looks at issues student-teachers raised in their stories and what makes their ideas different from or similar to expectations. A greater percentage of them portrayed tragedy as a catalyst to successful life. Education as a right is portrayed as a delicacy which is given out of pity or as an insurance policy to safeguard the future of the parents or sponsors. Forty of the students were randomly and conveniently selected and interviewed to find out their perception of children and childhood. They all agreed that parents or sponsors must benefit from children’s education otherwise it is baseless to finance it. Most of them were of the view that the hardship they encountered in childhood groomed them to face the future bravely and take their destinies into their own hands. As pertaining to rights of children, they assert to the idea that a child has a right as long as the parent or guardian can afford to let him or her have it. In spite of some negative attitudes to childhood, they all agree that the psychologically fulfilled child could make a better adult.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rev. Kwesi Nkum Wilson (PhD)
1-day workshop organized by St Paul Methodist Preparatory & Junior High School..  El-Capitano Hotel, Agona Duakwa, C/R 9th March 2017

Paper presented:
Effective Management of School Resources for Productivity

Abstract
School administrators must ensure judicious utilisation of resources, which include a stock of supply of money, materials, staff and other assets that can be drawn of by a person or organization in order to function effectively. Judicious utilisation is the act or process of deciding how to use something prudently as means to accomplish an end. The rate at which goods are produced or work is completed. The ratio of the quantity and quality of units produced to the labour per unit of time. The rate at which goods are produced or work is completed. The ratio of the quantity and quality of units produced to the labour per unit of time. The relevance of teacher education lies in the fact that the quality of a nation’s school cannot be better than the calibre of the teacher in the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rev. Kwesi Nkum Wilson (PhD)
26th Anniversary Celebration & 9th Speech and Prize-Giving Day Celebration of Kwanyako Senior High Technical School, Agona Kwanyako. Agona Kwanyako SHTS 18th march, 2017

Paper presented:
The development of Ghana is founded on well-educated youth: the role of the stakeholders.

Abstract
Providing good and quality education has confronted every society, whether simple or complex. Various societies have questioned the education given to its young ones, as to whether it addresses problems confronting them or whether that education is relevant. In recent times we have had governments embarking on reviews of educational policies and programmes, just to make it more relevant and meaningful to societal demands. In Ghana, the recent (2002) work done by Prof. Jophus Anamuah-Mensah readily comes to mind.The concept ‘quality’ is hard to define precisely, especially in the context of education. Any statement about quality implies a certain relative measure against a common standard, in education; such a common standard does not exist. Purposeful education trains the person totally – head, hand and inner being (Psycho-somatic-pneumatic). Any attempt to overlook any of these will create disaster for that person and society. We need education that will transform our outlook and fire our imaginations especially in problem solving activities. I propose compulsory military training as part of national service I believe with basic military training our young ones will be imbued with the sense of nationalism, initiative, bravery, self-discipline and dedication. I propose that the National Service Secretariat and the Ghana Armed Forces should lead this. Service persons within a district should be brought together during every vacation for basic military training for two-three weeks; these training will include entrepreneurial education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rev. Kwesi Nkum Wilson (PhD)
In-Service Training for staff of Estate Section, organised by the Division of Human Resource, UEW. Jophus Anamuah Mensah’s Auditorium. 2nd February 2017

Paper presented:
Managing Life from a Spiritual Perspective

Abstract
Spiritual health is a highly individualized concept that is measured by the amount of peace and harmony an individual experiences in his day-to-day life. Spiritual life must be taken seriously regardless of your religious affiliation. “God did not design mankind to die early in active working service,” negative effect of fear affects person’s life. Fear is a false element that kills so they should kill fear before it kills them. Members must take particular care about their children, so that they can in turn take care of them in their old age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rev. Kwesi Nkum Wilson (PhD)
2016 Retirees Seminar. Demonstration Theatre, North Campus, UEW, Winneba. 15-16th June 2016

Paper presented:
Retirement Preparation and Life in Retirement

Abstract
Ghanaians often never think of retirement when they start working, hence they are not able to make the right decisions concerning it. Four crucial things to consider for an individual’s retirement are a Dwelling House, Stable family, Children who are out of school or at the tertiary level and modest savings. Lack of any of these, creates a serious problem for the retired person, he said. Retirement is a phase in life and not a crisis situation. Just like a child moves from the adolescent stage to adulthood, retirement is supposed to be a smooth transition if one really plans it well. Additionally, it is important to do a checklist on oneself by using the following; • At what age will I retire • Where will I live when I retire • When to start a family and what number of family • How will I sustain my family when I retire (consider Passive Income Generation) • What kind of lifestyle do I hope to lead after retirement Before retirement, one needs to build social networks, engage in voluntary activities, church or political activities and locate old friends. Humans are Psycho (Mind) Somatic (Body) Pneumatic (Spirit) beings and therefore every aspect of our personality must be well nurtured before we retire. Retirement is more desirable than dying on the job, therefore prepare to retire and enjoy your retirement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilson, K. N.
24th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the study of Behavioural Development. Vilius, Lithuania 10-14th July 2016

Paper presented:
Predictors of Retirement Adjustment among Senior Staff of Public Universities in Ghana

Abstract
Retirement as a stage in life has been seen differently by different people based on their perception, preparation and personal experience. This study investigated some of the institutional and personality variables that could predict retirement adjustments among the senior staff of three public universities in Ghana. Using the mixed method approach of research with the descriptive survey as the research design, the study employed the stratified sampling technique to select the universities, and the availability technique to select a sample size of 111 respondents (who had less than 60 months to attain the compulsory retirement of 60 years in Ghana) out of which 15 were through a consensus. The study made use of two instruments comprising a self-report questionnaire (Retirement Adjustment Questionnaire) and semi-structured interview sessions. Both the descriptive and inferential statistical tools were used to analyse the quantitative data using the cronbach co-efficient internal consistency of 0.872. The qualitative data was transcribed into text and subjected to thick narrative descriptions from which thematic categories with explanations emerged throughout the study for conclusions and recommendations to be made. Findings from the study revealed that one main consideration or adjustment process for retirement was the financial implications on the retiree. The study thus recommends among other things pre-retirement workshops/seminars on socio-economic, political and institutional factors that could influence retirement adjustment processes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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