R&P Entries

Conferences/Workshop/Symposia/Seminar with Presentations

Hanson, R.
International Teacher Education Conference. Harvard University, Boston, Massachussetts, U.S.A August 16-19, 2017

Paper presented:
Using activity worksheets to unearth 10th grade students’ perceptions about word chemical equations

Abstract
An in-depth constructivist and interpretive study was carried out with 31 students from a Ghanaian High School over a period of three weeks in order to elicit their interpretations, concerns, and constructions of word equations. This was a qualitative research to generate, analyse, and interpret data from individual narratives and translate ideas belonging to a community to represent discourses of that community. Results indicated that psychological, cognitive and language issues affected students’ conception. Their capacity to reason was linked to both concept, structure and strategies for presenting analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationJan 11, 20182018/2019

Hanson, R.
Canada International Conference on Education (CICE-2017) Edited By Charles A. Shoniregun Galyna A. Akmayeva Collated By Holly Green Glen Potter CICE ©. University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada June 26-29, 2017

Paper presented:
Assessing the potential of worksheets as a tool for revealing teacher trainees' conceptions about chemical bonds

Abstract
The conceptions held by undergraduate teacher trainees about basic types of chemical bonds are investigated in this paper. The research was carried out with 95 first year Chemistry education teacher trainees purposely chosen from two teacher training institutions. Participants worked on worksheets which showed figures of compounds with different kinds of chemical bonds after which their answers were scored and interpreted in order to understand the possible reasons behind their choices. Results from the activity indicated that more than 80% of the chemistry education trainees had vernacular and conceptual misconceptions about basic chemical bonding, which stemmed from their environment, text books and teachers. Some suggestions were made for more effective teaching approaches to enhance teacher trainees’ conceptual understanding of chemical bonds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationJan 11, 20182018/2019

Hanson, R.
Canada International Conference on Education (CICE-2017) Edited By Charles A. Shoniregun Galyna A. Akmayeva Collated By Holly Green Glen Potter CICE ©. University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada June 26-29, 2017

Paper presented:
Assessing the potential of worksheets as a tool for revealing teacher trainees' conceptions about chemical bonds

Abstract
The conceptions held by undergraduate teacher trainees about basic types of chemical bonds are investigated in this paper. The research was carried out with 95 first year Chemistry education teacher trainees purposely chosen from two teacher training institutions. Participants worked on worksheets which showed figures of compounds with different kinds of chemical bonds after which their answers were scored and interpreted in order to understand the possible reasons behind their choices. Results from the activity indicated that more than 80% of the chemistry education trainees had vernacular and conceptual misconceptions about basic chemical bonding, which stemmed from their environment, text books and teachers. Some suggestions were made for more effective teaching approaches to enhance teacher trainees’ conceptual understanding of chemical bonds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationJan 11, 20182018/2019

Samlafo, B.V, Bobobee, L.H, Quarshie, E , Sarsah, L.A and Kaka, E.A
2nd World International conference on Industrial Chemistry and Water Treatment. Las Vegas, USA 22nd -23rd, May, 2017

Paper presented:
Quality assessment of groundwater from Avenorfeme: Akatsi District, Ghana

Abstract
A holistic assessment of the quality of groundwater from the shallow unconfined aquifers of the Avenorfeme and surrounding villages in the Akatsi South District in the Volta Region of Ghana has been conducted. A groundwater classification scheme has been developed for groundwater in the area using a robust water quality index (WQI) modified for the case of the study area. For calculating the WQI, pH, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, chloride, nitrate, sulphate, total dissolved solids, and fluorides have been considered. On the basis of the WQI so computed, groundwater fell within the ‘Excellent”, “Good”, “Poor” and “unsuitable for drinking” categories. This study finds that the salinity of the groundwater in the area is largely attributed to mineral weathering leading to evolution of predominantly intermediate to high salinity Na-Cl water types. On account of salinity hazard, most of the waters are not suitable for irrigation in the area. Based on total hardness, the groundwater in the area is permanently hard. Keywords: Groundwater, Akatsi district, Volta, Water Quality Index, SAR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationNov 20, 20172018/2019

Sam, E. F. & Glozah, F. N.
2017 Ghana Geographers’ Association Conference. Ho, Ghana 3-5 August 2017

Paper presented:
Age, sex and socio-economic status do not moderate the relation between knowledge of safe road practices and attitude towards safe road practices in Ghanaian school children

Abstract
Children, especially those attending school, take high risks in traffic, particularly in relation to their regular interaction with the road environment. It is known that age, sex, and socio-economic circumstances of school children influence the relationship between their knowledge and attitude towards safe road practices, although this has not been explored among Ghanaian school children. The aim of this study was to examine the role of age, sex and socio-economic status (SES) in the relationship between knowledge and attitude of safe road practices among Ghanaian school children. A random sample of 348 school children was drawn from 11 schools in the Cape Coast Metropolis in Ghana. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis found that age, sex and SES do not moderate the relation between knowledge of and attitude towards safe road practices. This result thus suggests that child traffic safety interventions and campaigns based on age, sex and SES may not be enough to guide children’s behaviour; likewise their knowledge and attitude. The study maintained that interventions targeted at the safety of the child-pedestrian especially in developing countries should go beyond educating them to acquire good knowledge and positive attitude of safe road practices to providing a safer environment that prioritises their needs, accommodates their curiosity and errors in traffic and enhances safer walking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sam, E. F., Daniels, S., Brijs, k; Brijs, T., & Wets, G.
30th International Co-operation on Theories and Concepts in Traffic Safety. Olomouc, Czech Republic 26-27 October 2017

Paper presented:
Modelling public bus/minibus transport accident severity in Ghana

Abstract
The current safety concerns with buses/minibuses (public transport) in both developed and developing countries have warranted a renewed interest in bus/minibus safety research. Prior to this, there was a paucity of research in this domain especially in developed countries where the safety associated with buses was deemed adequate. In this study, we examined the factors that influence bus/minibus accident severity in Ghana using bus/minibus accident data from 2011-2015. We estimated the probability of bus/minibus accident severity by fitting generalised ordered logit models. The findings revealed that the day of the week, the presence of road median, adverse weather, daylight condition, good road terrain, the presence of traffic controls, the manner of collisions, and where drunk driving was not involved are associated with elevated bus/minibus accident severity. Conversely, vehicle type, road shoulder condition, accident location and absence of traffic control reduce the severity of bus/minibus accidents. The research, policy, and practice implications of the findings are elucidated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owusu, S.
30th West African Languages Congress & 10th Linguistics Association of Ghana Conference. University of Education, Winneba, Ghana July 31 to August 5, 2017

Paper presented:
Language Anxiety and its Effect on Oral Performance Of Students during Post-Internship Seminar Presentations at The Faculty of Ghanaian Languages Education, UEW

Abstract
Language anxiety has been found to have an adverse effect on oral performance. Many second/foreign language learners often experience the feeling of unease, nervousness, apprehension, and intimidation when they are performing in a second/foreign language, a phenomenon known as xenoglossophobia. It was hypothesised that the students at the Faculty of Ghanaian Languages Education, University of Education, Winneba would experience language anxiety during the post-internship seminar presentations. Many of them are native speakers of the languages they are studying at the University. With the exception of the general courses which are taught and assessed in English, teaching and assessment of the departmental courses are done in Ghanaian languages. However, the post-internship seminar presentations are done in English in the presence of their lecturers and lecturers from other departments. The students may be intimidated by the presence of their professors because of the fear of negative evaluation. This may cause language anxiety in the students which may also have negative impact on their oral performance. Using the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS), the paper investigated the effects language anxiety on oral performance of students during the post-internship seminar presentations at the Faculty of Ghanaian Languages Education. The objective of the paper was to answer the question: How does language anxiety affect the oral performance of students during the post-internship seminar presentations? 200 level 400 students were purposively selected for the study. The results indicated that the respondents experienced language anxiety during the post-internship seminar presentations, and that language anxiety was the major cause of the students’ poor performance during the seminar presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danso, H.
7th West Africa Built Environment Research (WABER) Conference. University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana 16-18 August 2017

Paper presented:
Improving Water Resistance of Compressed Earth Blocks Enhanced with Natural Fibres

Abstract
Studies have shown a great potential for the use of CEBs as a sustainable building material due to its economic, environmental and social benefits. This study investigates the water resistance characteristics of CEBs reinforced with natural fibres. The fibres were sourced from coconut husk, sugarcane bagasse and oil palm fruit at 1 wt% added to two soil samples. The CEB specimen size of 290 × 140 × 100 mm were made at a constant pressure of 10 MPa and dried in the sun for 21 days. Accelerated erosion test was conducted to determine the resistance of the specimen to continuous rainfall condition. It was discovered that the fibres helped in reducing the erodability rate of the blocks, though there were some degree of damage. The difference between the water resistance of the unreinforced and fibre reinforced CEBs were found to be statistically significant. Furthermore, the surface of the fibre reinforced blocks eroded rapidly in depth than the internal part, and there was reduction in the depth difference of the erosion with increase time of water spraying on the specimens. The study concludes that though the addition of fibres in soil blocks does not completely prevent the block from erosion, the impact of the fibres on the blocks significantly reduce the erosion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Technical EducationSep 08, 20172016/2017

Acquaye, V.N.A.
Images of Childhood and the Future: Cross-cultural Perspectives. Europa-University, Flensburg, Germany 29th June – 1st July, 2017

Paper presented:
Young but not clueless; exploring children’s perception of a better future through creative writing

Abstract
Most stories written for and about children were written by adults. In such stories, adults try to portray children’s views, aspirations, fears and sentiments. Although adults might write based on their experiences from their childhood, research has shown that there are significant differences in children’s thoughts and actions and adults thinking for children and thus for research on children to be effective, they must be involved. The purpose of this study was to explore children’s perception of better future in childhood through creative writing. The children’s stories were subjected to close reading and text analysis with particular attention to their presentation of details on incidence, characters, conflicts and resolution as they express their ideas of a better future. They focused more on time spent in school. Their time spent at home was minimal and focus mostly on things they lacked at home. They presented themselves as hardworking, hopeful and brilliant. They emphasized conflicts with their parents and siblings more than friends. They portrayed their friends as sources of solace to run to when the home becomes unbearable. In their resolutions, they enumerated their future desires and settled on working harder especially in their studies to change their future. They also prayed to God to provide what they or their parents cannot afford. It was deduced from their stories that children understand their dependency but insist decisions concerning them be left to them, yet, their needs and wants must be met. They also want more quality relationship with especially their parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Educational StudiesAug 08, 20172016/2017

Acquaye, V.N.A.
Images of Childhood and the Future: Cross-cultural Perspectives. Europa-University, Flensburg, Germany 29th June – 1st July, 2017

Paper presented:
Young but not clueless; exploring children’s perception of a better future through creative writing

Abstract
Most stories written for and about children were written by adults. In such stories, adults try to portray children’s views, aspirations, fears and sentiments. Although adults might write based on their experiences from their childhood, research has shown that there are significant differences in children’s thoughts and actions and adults thinking for children and thus for research on children to be effective, they must be involved. The purpose of this study was to explore children’s perception of better future in childhood through creative writing. The children’s stories were subjected to close reading and text analysis with particular attention to their presentation of details on incidence, characters, conflicts and resolution as they express their ideas of a better future. They focused more on time spent in school. Their time spent at home was minimal and focus mostly on things they lacked at home. They presented themselves as hardworking, hopeful and brilliant. They emphasized conflicts with their parents and siblings more than friends. They portrayed their friends as sources of solace to run to when the home becomes unbearable. In their resolutions, they enumerated their future desires and settled on working harder especially in their studies to change their future. They also prayed to God to provide what they or their parents cannot afford. It was deduced from their stories that children understand their dependency but insist decisions concerning them be left to them, yet, their needs and wants must be met. They also want more quality relationship with especially their parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Educational StudiesAug 08, 20172016/2017

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