R&P Entries

Conferences/Workshop/Symposia/Seminar with Presentations

Adomako, K.; A. Agoswin Musah, Atibiri A. Sandow & Reginald A. Duah
12th Linguistics Association of Ghana (LAG) Conference. Paa Grant University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, Ghana 31st July, - 2nd August, 2019

Paper presented:
• Kusaal and Akan as dialects of the same language? A comparative analysis of some peculiar lexical items

Abstract

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kpodo, P.; Adomako, K.; & Amoh, S.
12th Linguistics Association of Ghana (LAG) Conference. Paa Grant University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, Ghana 31st July, - 2nd August, 2019

Paper presented:
Some morphophonological processes in the adaptation of Akan personal day-names in Ewe

Abstract

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tomekyin, C., Adomako, K. & Nyame, J.
50th Annual Conference on African Linguistics (ACAL). University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada 22nd May, - 25th May, 2019

Paper presented:
The phonology of compounds in Nzema

Abstract
This paper examines some phonological processes that are observed in the formation of some compounds in Nzema, a Niger-Congo (Kwa, Bia) language spoken mainly in the Western Region of Ghana and Ivory Coast. The paper focuses on some phonological rules that ensue at morpheme juncture processes in the process of the formation of some compounds in Nzema. The compound types discussed in the present paper include noun-noun, noun-adjective, noun-verb, pronominal-noun, and pronominal-verb. In this paper, we consider mainly elision that targets the final V of the first and initial V of the second morphemes at the morpheme boundary. We show that, inter alia, in Nzema, morpheme2-initial Vs (i.e. V2) are mostly targeted for deletion as compared to the elision of the first vowel, V1. At morpheme juncture in V1#V2, it is the V2 that is systematically targeted for deletion irrespective of its quality. Moreover, in a context of V1#V2 where the two vowels are of same quality, tone is crucial in determining the target for the deletion process, however, it is the V2 that consistently give in to elision irrespective of tone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owusu, S.
12th Linguistics Association of Ghana Annual Conference (LAG 2018). University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa July 31 to Aug. 2, 2019

Paper presented:
Idioms as a Measure of Proficiency Level of Ghanaian ESL Learners

Abstract
The idiom is defined as a habitual unit of language, the meaning of which cannot be deduced by summing up the meanings of its individual components. Instead, idioms are fixed phraseological units by their long usage and have to be learned as a whole. It is said that if natural language had been designed by a logician, idioms would not exist. L2 learners’ ability to use idioms appropriately in the written and the spoken discourse is considered as a sign of communicative competence. What this means is that there is a close correlation between idiomatic knowledge and second language proficiency and that like proverbs, idioms can be used to measure one’s proficiency level. The objective of the paper was to use English idioms to measure the proficiency level of the first year students of English at the University of Education, Winneba. Convenience sampling was used to select 110 level 100 students of English, to whom the researcher was teaching Introduction to Linguistics. The respondents were tasked to answer a questionnaire involving ten common idioms in English. Findings showed that the respondents were found to be fairly proficient in their acquisition of the English idioms selected for the study. The results of this study could have important implications for the design of appropriate courses geared at helping the students to improve on their level of proficiency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owusu, S.
1st South African Association for Language Teaching (SAALT) and Southern African Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Association (SALALS) Joint Annual Conference 2019. University of Pretoria, Groenkloof Campus, South Africa June 30 to July 4, 2019

Paper presented:
Evaluating the Content Validity of High-Stakes ESL Tests in Ghana

Abstract
A good test should have content validity, that is, it should reflect the objectives and the content of the curriculum, so that the test would be representative, relevant, and comprehensive. It is said that for a test to promote positive washback, it should reflect the course objectives upon which the test content is based. The high-stakes English language tests in Ghana should therefore reflect the objectives of the English language curriculum. The objective of this paper was to find out whether or not the high-stakes English language tests in Ghana cover the objectives and the content of the English language curriculum. The paper makes use of the data gathered through questionnaires and document analysis to provide answers to the research question: To what extent are the high-stakes English language tests in Ghana aligned with the English language curriculum? The English language syllabus and past questions from 2010 to 2017 were analysed to establish the relationship between the test items and the prescribed English language syllabus. Again, a questionnaire was conducted with 24 English language teachers from 4 junior high schools and 8 eight senior high schools. Analysis of data revealed that the high-stakes English language tests in Ghana lacked washback validity. This means that the objectives of the English language curriculum were not fully reflected in the tests, since some topics or areas in the English language syllabus were not examined. This gap between the objectives of English language curriculum and the focus of the high-stakes tests encouraged the teachers to teach to the test, thereby concentrating on only the areas that were examined in the high-stakes tests. The teachers concentrated on grammatical structure, reading comprehension, and essay writing which were tested in the high-stakes tests. In effect, the results of this research work could have important implications for high-stakes English language test system reform, and the roles high-stakes language tests play in shaping ESL classroom practices in Ghanaian schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mensah, B.; Darkwa , I.O; Bonful,E.; Moses, B. T. Pomeyie,C. N; Mohammed S. & Danso-Wiredu E. Y
Ghana Geographers Association Annual Conference 2019: Smart Cities in the 21st Century: The Geographers Perspective.. KNUST, Kumasi 6th-10th August 2019

Paper presented:
Application of Classical Urban Land Use Models to Internal Structure of Ghanaian Cities

Abstract
Ghana is rapidly urbanizing. Villages are growing into towns, towns into cities, and cities into more sophisticated planned areas. Theories and models have been postulated to explain the internal structure of cities in developed countries, especially with respect to land use variations: Concentric Zone model by Ernest W. Burgess, Sector model by Homer Hoyt, and Multiple nuclei by Harris and Ullman. Some scholars have argued that these classical models of urban structure developed in North America prior to 1945 have cross-cultural application. This paper basically sought to assess the extent to which the internal structure of some selected Ghanaian cities portray the land uses put forward by the classical urban land-use models. The study employed Geographic Information System (GIS) as a major tool of analysis whiles making use of in-depth ground observations of the study cities. The findings of the study showed that, whereas the Central Business District, the wedge-shaped residential zones, and the presence of multiple nuclei were characteristic of some Ghanaian cities, the absence of homogeneity in most of the sectors and undefined industrial zones were typical contradictions. The models could therefore be applied minimally to the older inner areas of the selected cities. Based on this, a new urban land use model for Ghanaian cities is proposed in the study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Danso-WireduE. Y. and Mohammed S.
Ghana Geographers Association Annual Conference 2019: Smart Cities in the 21st Century: The Geographers Perspective. KNUST, Kumasi 6th-10th August 2019

Paper presented:
Environmental Dynamism: increasing housing needs in Urban Ghana, a threat to environmental resources?

Abstract
The rate of indiscriminate deforestation for housing purpose in Ghana is as a result of lack of a comprehensive land use policy in the country. Land has been managed through various legal instruments and customary practices. Since land is in the hands of the community members, the state seems helpless in ensuring that various land use purposes are achieved. Though it is clearly stated in the country’s land policy that ‘the principle of optimum usage for all types of land uses, will be assured by the government, the same document states clearly that the state will ensure that every socio-economic activity is consistent with sound land use through sustainable land use planning in the long-term. But evidence in the country is contrary to what is stipulated in the land use policy document. The study therefore focuses on the use of agricultural land at the fringes of urban Ghana for housing purposes. This is a largely desktop research focusing on review of literature, the use of Old maps, GIS and employing observation techniques to study land cover change and housing provision. The study found out that land use cover in areas close to the city of Accra and Tamale has largely been replaced by housing. It concluded that if land use policy is not put in place to restrain Ghanaians from excessive deforestation for housing, the country stands the chance of losing its natural resources, especially, the forest vegetation. It ends by advocating sound sustainable housing typologies in the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Akayuure, P.
International Conference on Engineering, Science and Mathematics Education. Acapulco Resort and Convention & SPA, Kyrenia, North Cyprus 8-10 November, 2019

Paper presented:
The Spatial Competency of Prospective Teachers to Teach Basic Shape and Space Concepts in Ghanaian Curriculum

Abstract
Teachers’ spatial competency is very critical for the effective teaching of shape and space concepts in the basic mathematics curriculum. However, it seems developing such competency remains a blind spot or implicit in teacher education curriculum in Ghana. Does teacher education provide the spatial thinking skills needed by basic schoolteachers to teach spatial concepts? The study investigated the spatial ability and self-efficacy levels reached by prospective teachers prior to their final-year teaching internship programme at the basic schools. The spatial competencies of 378 final-year prospective teachers from 4 colleges of education in Ghana were measured using spatial orientation and visualization tests, and self-efficacy questionnaire. The two tests were highly reliable with 60% correlation between them. No gender or programme differences existed. The mean achievement in orientation was significantly higher than the visualization test. Findings support the argument for teacher institutions to pay more attention to prospective teachers’ spatial skills development as means of promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationMay 05, 20202020/2021


International Conference on Engineering, Science and Mathematics Education. Acapulco Resort and Convention & SPA, Kyrenia, North Cyprus 8-10 November, 2019

Paper presented:
The Spatial Competency of Prospective Teachers to Teach Basic Shape and Space Concepts in Ghanaian Curriculum

Abstract
Teachers’ spatial competency is very critical for the effective teaching of shape and space concepts in the basic mathematics curriculum. However, it seems developing such competency remains a blind spot or implicit in teacher education curriculum in Ghana. Does teacher education provide the spatial thinking skills needed by basic schoolteachers to teach spatial concepts? The study investigated the spatial ability and self-efficacy levels reached by prospective teachers prior to their final-year teaching internship programme at the basic schools. The spatial competencies of 378 final-year prospective teachers from 4 colleges of education in Ghana were measured using spatial orientation and visualization tests, and self-efficacy questionnaire. The two tests were highly reliable with 60% correlation between them. No gender or programme differences existed. The mean achievement in orientation was significantly higher than the visualization test. Findings support the argument for teacher institutions to pay more attention to prospective teachers’ spatial skills development as means of promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty of Science EducationMay 05, 20202020/2021

Essel, O. Q & .Amissah, E. R. K.
AFRICAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION OF AFRICA (ASAA) THIRD INTERNATIONAL BIENNIAL CONFERENCE 2019. United States International University-Africa. Nairobi, Kenya 24th to 26th OCTOBER 2019

Paper presented:
Fashion journalism (re)presentation on apprenticeship-trained fashion designers of Ghana from the 1950s to 1970s

Abstract
Sartorial apprenticeship system in Ghana predates colonialists’ invasion. This system of training tailors, dressmakers and designers in fashion making and production was handed-down from generation to generation. It was the main mode of skill development and training acquisition. This system produced creative tailors, dressmakers and designers who produced both simple and complex dress fashion for the people. Their designs helped in clothing the kings, chiefdom and the Ghanaian society at large. They produced pure Ghanaian classical fashion that continue to inspire global fashion, and dress fashion that exhibits cross-cultural influences in main market places. Colonialists’ contact with the people of Ghana, sought to the introduction of relatively new system of training they called formal education while the apprenticeship system was labelled as informal education. Though the introduction of formal education in Ghana was not totally negative, the elitist nomenclature and popular perception about it portrayed it as most perfect system of sartorial education and training. This bred negative perceptions about apprenticeship training as inferior and positioned it as the preserve of those who are not academically gifted. Consequently, this brought into existence two main modes of fashion education and training namely academic (formal school education) and non-academic (apprenticeship). Amidst the longstanding colonial-inspired perception of non-academic fashion training and education as inferior, how did the Ghanaian fashion press (re)presented apprenticeship-trained tailors, dressmakers and designers in the local popular print media at the time? What narrative did the press give about the dress fashion creation of the tailors, dressmakers and designers? How did Ghana’s press (re)presentation of tailors, dressmakers and designers repress and or transmit local fashion history? The study investigates the shifting perceptions of apprenticeship-trained dress fashion designers and their (re)presentation in the eyes of the press (fashion journalism) in the 1950s. This historical study is premised on textual analysis of fashion discourse in journalism in the 1950s since the period experienced massive government-sponsored fashion training and education of designers overseas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

School of Creative ArtsJan 07, 20202020/2021

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